Friday, October 30, 2015

SANOFI Allergy Injectors RECALLED!

SANOFI Allergy Injectors RECALLED!

Sanofi is recalling hundreds of thousands of epinephrine injectors used to treatsevere allergic reactions because they may not deliver the correct amount of the life-saving drug.
The recall includes all Auvi-Q injections currently on the U.S. market, or roughly 490,000 packs of the devices, the company said in a press release. Most packs include two injectors.
Sanofi's product competes with Mylan's EpiPen, which is a staple of first-aid care. Both products are used to treat allergic reactions caused by insect bites and stings, foods, medicines or other substances.
About 200,000 people in the U.S. have Sanofi's injector, according to company estimates.
The French drug and vaccine maker said it has received 26 reports of malfunctions with the injectors. None involved patient deaths, according to the company announcement.
Consumers can call 1-866-726-6340 or visit the product's website for information on how to return the injector. They should also contact their health provider to get a prescription for an alternate device.
"As this is a life-saving device, it is important that consumers understand not only to return the recalled device, but to get a replacement epinephrine auto-injector first," said a company spokeswoman in an emailed statement.
Auvi-Q auto injectors were distributed throughout the U.S. through pharmacies, hospitals and wholesalers. The Paris-based company said it has kept the Food and Drug Administration abreast of the recall. The agency approved Auvi-Q in August 2012.

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Thursday, September 10, 2015

On Call with Dr. Azzariti

September is the only month of year that I get to ask all my patients the same question when they come to the office…the infamous question is “How is school going this year?!!”  Inevitably I get a full gamut of answers, from great to “not so much,” to coin the popular phrase.
I asked our editor Donna Thomas to find our patients a great article that speaks directly to them, not necessarily their parents, but they can share it with mom and dad of course!

So parents, I would ask you to share this article with your children, and please let them know that on the home page of our website we have great resources for parents, teens and kids. Donna tells me it’s full of informative articles written at every level.

As parents, we need to understand that sometimes our children are more comfortable reading about an issue they may be experiencing,g rather than talking to a parent or a friend. That is why we rely on as a primary source for topical articles in pediatrisc.

I hope your kids will find this article on returning to school helpful. It certainly has been a while sinceI have had to deal with my daughters returning to school!  But, I am very fortunate to have grandchildren ranging from elementary school through college, so you can imagine the variety of stories I hear!

I want to wish all our  Pedimedica patients and the children of our wonderful staff a happy and healthy school year!

All the best,

Dr. “A”

It's school time again! You're probably feeling excited and maybe a little sad that summer is over. Some kids feel nervous or a little scared on the first day of school because of all the new things: new teachers, new friends, and maybe even a new school. Luckily, these "new" worries only stick around for a little while. Let's find out more about going back to school.

The First Day
Most teachers kick off the school year by introducing themselves and talking about all the stuff you'll be doing that year. Some teachers give students a chance to tell something about themselves to the rest of the class.

When teachers do the talking on the first day, they often go over classroom rules so you'll know what's allowed and what's not. Pay close attention so you'll know if you need to raise your hand to ask a question and what the rules are about visiting the restroom.

You might already know a lot of kids in your classes on the first day. But it's a great day to make a new friend, so try to say hello to kids you know and new ones that you don't. Make the first move and you'll be glad you did and so will your new friend!

Moving to Middle School?
Sixth grade often signals a move to middle school or junior high, where you'll find lockers and maybe a homeroom. This is just what it sounds like — a classroom you'll go to each morning, kind of like your home in the school. In middle school, you might move from classroom to classroom for each subject. Your teachers know that this is a big change from elementary school and will help you adjust.

Most teachers let you pick your own seat on the first day, but by the second or third morning, they'll have mapped out a seating plan. At first, it's a good idea to write down where your seat is in your notebook so you don't forget.
Feeling Good on Day One
Seeing friends you haven't seen in a while can make the first day a good one. You also can make the day feel special by wearing an outfit you like. Maybe you got a great T-shirt on vacation, or your new sneakers put a spring in your step. If you wear a uniform, you might wear a favorite watch, a new hair band, or a piece of jewelry to show your personal style.

It can make you feel good to be prepared and have all the supplies you need. Some schools distribute supply lists before the year begins, so you can come stocked up on pencils, folders, and whatever else you'll be needing. Once you've covered the basics, you might tuck an extra few dollars in your backpack for an emergency (like forgetting your lunch money). Or maybe you'd like to bring along a book or magazine to read while you're on the bus.

Whatever you put in your backpack, make sure you pack it the night before. This prevents the morning panic when you can't find your homework or lunch box. Speaking of lunch, that's something else that can help you feel good at school — whether it's the first day or the 100th day. Help your parents pack it the night before if you don't like what's on the menu at the cafeteria. Try to include a variety of foods in your packed lunch, especially fruits and vegetables.

Get Oriented
The first day of school is your first chance to find your way around a new school, or learn the pathways to new classes in your old school. It's a lot to learn in one day, so don't be surprised if you need a reminder or two.

It might help to write a few notes to yourself, so you'll remember the important stuff, like your locker combination and that lunch starts at 11:43, not 12:10. Before you know it, your fingers will fly as you open your locker and you won't have to check your notes to know what time lunch starts!

A Bad Start?
What if you hate school by the end of day one? Teachers recommend giving things some time to sort themselves out — once you know your way around the building and get adjusted to the new routine, you'll probably feel better. If those feelings don't fade, talk to your mom, dad, teacher, or school counselor.
Here are a few final tips for a fantastic school year:
  • Get enough sleep.
  • Eat a healthy breakfast.
  • Try your best.
  • Use good work habits, like writing down your assignments and turning in your homework on time.
  • Take your time with school work. If you don't understand something, ask the teacher.
  • Keep a sense of humor. One teacher we know shows his new students a picture of himself graduating high school — a grinning ape in a red graduation cap and gown. This usually makes the kids laugh, and it's a good way to remind them that school is fun!

Friday, September 4, 2015

The doctors at Pedimedica bring you important news on NJ's first car seat law.

The doctors at Pedimedica bring you important news on NJ's first car seat law.

August 28, 2015 at 2:45 PM
FLORHAM PARK, NJ - New Jersey's new car seat law for children that goes into effect Tuesday, Sept. 1, will reduce the leading cause of death and injury for children 14 and younger, which is car accidents, according to the AAA (American Automobile Association).
New Jersey's new standards are the first of its kind to be signed into law in the nation.
“These new regulations will ensure that New Jersey remains a leader in child passenger safety,” Cathleen Lewis, director of public affairs and government relations for AAA Northeast in New Jersey, said. “The new law, which requires parents to adhere to American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for use of child safety seats, is the easiest way to keep New Jersey’s children safe on the road.”
Under the new law:
  • Children under age 2 AND weighing less than 30 pounds must be secured in a rear-facing child safety seat that is equipped with a five-point harness.
  • Children ages 2 – 4 and weighing up to 40 pounds must be secured in a child-safety seat equipped with a five-point harness, either rear-facing (up to the height and weight limits of the seat) or forward-facing.
  • Children ages 4 – 8 and less than 57” tall (4’9”) must be secured in a forward-facing seat equipped with a five-point harness (up to the height and weight limits of the seat) or in a booster seat.
  • Children ages 8 – 17 must use the vehicles seat belt. The safest place for children under 13 is the back seat.
Amanda Norek, Chatham mother of three children ages 3, almost 2 and four months, says it is going to take some adjustment.
"I feel like now that they've been facing forward, they're at the age where they like to look around, so it will take some time to get used to it," Norek said. "Especially now when they look around for trucks on the road. They'll know what they're missing, so turning them to backwards is going to be a change."
Once they are turned to face forward, children must remain in 5-point harness car seats until they are 4-years-old or weigh 40 pounds. The new law also says that children must remain in booster seats until they reach the age of 8 or 57 inches in height.
Fines for violation of the law will range from $50 to $75.
"I've read online about how their necks are not developed at a young age, so if you're in an accident it's safer to have them facing the rear," Norek said. "I don't think a lot of people know about the new law."
Lieutenant Brian Gibbons of the Chatham Borough Police Department has been reading up on the new law himself.
"This makes some pretty significant adjustments to the law," Gibbons said. "It's going to make it safer for infants and children. It's clear from any information you read on the subject that rear-facing seats protect the neck and spinal chord. The longer children can sit in rear-facing seats, the safer they'll be."
The Chatham Borough Police plan to launch an awareness campaign about the new law this month.
"We'll work with the school district to make sure that parents are aware of the new law," Gibbons said.

Original Articles

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

On Call... with Editor Donna Thomas

With all the sunscreens available these days (organic or mineral? water-resistant or sweat-resistant? lotion or spray?), choosing the right one for your kids can be tricky. But what matters most when picking a sunscreen is how well it protects skin from UV rays. Donna shares valuable information from on what you should know.
How to Choose

Look for SPF (sun protection factor) numbers on the labels of sunscreens. Select an SPF of 30 or higher to prevent sunburn and tanning, both of which are signs of skin damage. Choose a sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB rays (usually labeled as a "broad-spectrum" sunscreen).

Sunscreen sprays are convenient but should be used with caution. For starters, sprays are easy to breathe in, which can irritate the lungs. Some sprays also are flammable, so you need to avoid sparks or flames when applying them and wearing them. And, sprays make it hard to tell if you have applied enough sunscreen, which increases the risk of sunburn.

Other things to consider:

  • Don't use sunscreens with PABA, which can cause skin allergies.
  • For sensitive skin, look for products with the active ingredient titanium dioxide.
  • If your teen or preteen wants to use a self-tanner sunscreen, be sure to get one that also has UV protection (many offer little or none).
  • Babies younger than 6 months should be kept out of the sun. When going outside, dress your baby in lightweight clothes that cover arms and legs — and don't forget a hat. If you can't avoid the sun, you can use a small amount of sunscreen on your baby's exposed skin, like the hands and face.

How to Use

For sunscreen to do its job, it must be used correctly. Be sure to:

  • Apply sunscreen whenever your kids will be in the sun. For best results, apply sunscreen about 15 to 30 minutes before kids go outside.
  • Don't forget about ears, hands, feet, shoulders, and behind the neck. Lift up bathing suit straps and apply sunscreen underneath them (in case the straps shift as a child moves). Protect lips with an SPF 30 lip balm.
  • Apply sunscreen generously — dermatologists recommend using 1 ounce (enough to fill a shot glass) to cover the exposed areas of the body.
  • Reapply sunscreen often, about every 2 hours. Reapply after a child has been sweating or swimming.
  • Apply a water-resistant sunscreen if kids will be around water or swimming. Water reflects and intensifies the sun's rays, so kids need protection that lasts. Water-resistant sunscreens may last up to 80 minutes in the water, and some are also sweat-resistant. But regardless of the water-resistant label, be sure to reapply sunscreen when kids come out of the water.
  • Don't worry about making a bottle of sunscreen last. Stock up, and throw out any sunscreen that is past its expiration date or that you have had for 3 years or longer.
  • Every child needs sun protection. The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) recommends that all kids — regardless of their skin tone — wear sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Although dark skin has more protective melanin and tans more easily than it burns, tanning is a sign of sun damage. Dark-skinned kids also can get painful sunburns.

And remember to be a good role model. Consistently wearing sunscreen with SPF 30 or greater and limiting your sun exposure will reduce your risk of skin damage and teach your kids good sun sense.

Photo source link : Discovery Channel (